liquidnature

gentlemanwillsloan:

WILL’S ART HOUSE

Apocalypse Pooh (1987)

Todd Graham’s notorious, unauthorized VHS-era mashup combines footage from Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day with audio from Apocalypse Now, to surprisingly plausible results.

“Critics who treat adult as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”

C.S. Lewis, “On Three Ways of Writing for Children,” 1952

(via the comments section of TNR's excellent response to The Slate Article That Shall Not Be Linked To.)

maleteen:

some people just normally look like they havent slept in weeks. i am one of those people

hugogreene:

Michal Cala
pricebullington:

Mark Rothko

pricebullington:

Mark Rothko

archatlas:

Jad Hak
Bradley Hankey | bradleyhankey.com Bradley Hankey | bradleyhankey.com Bradley Hankey | bradleyhankey.com Bradley Hankey | bradleyhankey.com Bradley Hankey | bradleyhankey.com Bradley Hankey | bradleyhankey.com Bradley Hankey | bradleyhankey.com Bradley Hankey | bradleyhankey.com

nevver:

Once upon a time in the west, Bradley Hankey

books0977:

The Picture Book. Girl reading book in window seat. Honor C Appleton (English, 1879-1951).
Appleton illustrated over 150 children’s books using watercolour and pen and ink drawings. She would spend many hours watching children at play, and her innocent and natural illustrations were generally from a floor level viewpoint and so were appealing to children who have the same perspective.

books0977:

The Picture Book. Girl reading book in window seat. Honor C Appleton (English, 1879-1951).

Appleton illustrated over 150 children’s books using watercolour and pen and ink drawings. She would spend many hours watching children at play, and her innocent and natural illustrations were generally from a floor level viewpoint and so were appealing to children who have the same perspective.

serriform:

Le mistral

nevver:

Dare alla Luce, Amy Friend


"Personally, I think that television means solitude while cinema means community. In the cinema, the tension is between the screen and the whole audience and not only between the screen and you. It makes an enormous difference. That is why it’s not true that the cinema is a mechanical toy. 
"It’s a well-known theory that film has twenty-four frames to the second, and that a film is always the same; but that’s not true. Even though the reel might be exactly the same, the film’s entirely different when it’s shown in a huge cinema, to an audience of a thousand, where a certain tension and atmosphere are created in perfect conditions, on a perfect screen, and with perfect sound. It’s a completely different film when shown in a small, smelly cinema in the suburbs, to an audience of four, one of whom might be snoring. It’s a different film. It’s not that you experience it differently. It is different. In this sense, films are hand-made; even though a film can be repeated because the reels are the same, each screening is unrepeatable.” 
— Krzysztof Kieślowski

"Personally, I think that television means solitude while cinema means community. In the cinema, the tension is between the screen and the whole audience and not only between the screen and you. It makes an enormous difference. That is why it’s not true that the cinema is a mechanical toy.

"It’s a well-known theory that film has twenty-four frames to the second, and that a film is always the same; but that’s not true. Even though the reel might be exactly the same, the film’s entirely different when it’s shown in a huge cinema, to an audience of a thousand, where a certain tension and atmosphere are created in perfect conditions, on a perfect screen, and with perfect sound. It’s a completely different film when shown in a small, smelly cinema in the suburbs, to an audience of four, one of whom might be snoring. It’s a different film. It’s not that you experience it differently. It is different. In this sense, films are hand-made; even though a film can be repeated because the reels are the same, each screening is unrepeatable.”

Krzysztof Kieślowski